Temperature Control of Reactors

Table of Contents

Introduction
Temperature Control of Reactors
Power to the Pumps
Process Stability

Introduction

In chemical laboratories, pilot plants, and industrial processes, temperature control demands the application of highly dynamic temperature control systems. When controlling reactors, exothermic and endothermic reactions must be compensated with high speed and reliability. A variety of influences and conditions must be taken into account when specifying the most suitable temperature control system. This article provides criteria and advice for selecting the most effective and most efficient solution for customers’ applications.

Highly dynamic temperature control systems represent the state-of-the-art for contemporary laboratories. The units are not only designed for precise temperature control but also for quick temperature changes, making them perfectly suited for material stress tests, temperature simulations, or reactor vessels.

Temperature Control of Reactors

Glass or steel reactors are used in most temperature control applications. Steel reactors are more durable and robust. Glass reactors enable the chemist to view processes within the reactor. However, glass reactors need extensive safety precautions for secure use. Reactors normally have an inner vessel containing the samples which necessitate temperature control. A jacket containing a heat-transfer liquid surrounds the inner vessel. The temperature control system is connected to the reactor jacket.

Highly dynamic temperature control systems cover a working temperature range between -92 °C and +250 °C with high cooling and heating capacity. Maximum heating capacity can also be changed according to fluctuations in the mains power supply. Highly efficient components give these instruments the ability to make up for exothermic and endothermic reactions with remarkable speed. Even if the ambient temperature climbs as high as +40 °C, the units work reliably as they are extremely robust. An internal, cooled expansion vessel and the integrated cooling machine absorb volume changes in the heat exchanger.

Temperature control of reactors

Temperature control of reactors

Conducting a series of experiments under identical temperature conditions is common practice in laboratories. Even failed experiments often need to be repeated precisely under the same control parameters. The temperature-control system should contain functions that facilitate precise reproducibility in these situations. The expense of generating documentation for an experiment is simultaneously lowered by these functions. Although temperature-control systems are progressively equipped with intuitive operating functions, it is still advisable to inquire about user training from the system manufacturer. Users must be very well trained in order to capably handle the increasingly complex systems and ever more stringent requirements to properly carry out experiments.

Power to the Pumps

Highly dynamic temperature control systems contain magnetically-coupled pumps that are powerful and maintenance-free. A controlled build-up of pump pressure, constant pressure, and high flow rates benefit lab users. Alterations in the temperature-control liquid’s viscosity are dynamically balanced. Self-lubricating pumps and permanent internal monitoring contribute to the units’ long service life. The capacity of the pump can be adjusted by the operator by entering a specific pressure or by selecting one of four stages. Once entered, the pressure value will be kept constant all through the complete process. The heat transfer liquid from ambient air is isolated by the closed pumping loop, preventing oxygen and moisture penetration. Simultaneously, this design ensures that the units do not release oil vapor.

Process Stability

Highly dynamic temperature control systems contain various features that ease daily laboratory routines.

For instance, the units use the same heat transfer liquid throughout the entire working temperature range. A temperature control solution must have sufficient cooling and heating capacity. The speed to reach desired temperatures significantly depends on the cooling and heating capacity. To establish the required heating/ cooling capacities, the user must take into account the specific heat capacity of the temperature control medium, the desired cool-down and heat-up times, the necessary differences in temperature as well as the mass of the samples. The filling opening for the liquid can be easily accessed on the top side of the unit.

As highly dynamic temperature control systems have closed side panels without ventilation slits, the minimum amount of space required to operate the units is reduced because the application or any other laboratory instruments may be placed right next to the highly dynamic temperature control system.

Process Stability

Process Stability

Process Stability

JULABO GMBH.

This information has been sourced, reviewed and adapted from materials provided by JULABO GMBH.

For more information on this source, please visit JULABO GMBH.

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