Developing Fuel Analysis to Detect Methanol in Biodiesel

Alternative fuel sources such as biodiesel are often a topic of news. Within the GC world of biodiesel analysis, EN 14110 is a method that measures methanol in finished biodiesel ranging from 0.01% to 0.50% (m/m).

Fuel Analysis to Determine Methanol Concentration

This is very similar to the methanol analysis carried out a while ago in crude oil experiments as both use static headspace GC to determine percentage level ranges of methanol.

The headspace chromatographic profile is simpler for biodiesel as it has fewer volatile components than light crude oil. This is demonstrated in Figure 1. There are only three notable peaks in the biodiesel headspace chromatogram: oxygen, water and methanol (all of which are easily identified by their absorbance spectra).

Shows a biodiesel headspace chromatogram with 0.50% (m/m) methanol. The inset plot shows the absorbance spectrum of methanol, which is distinct from water and oxygen.

Figure 1. Shows a biodiesel headspace chromatogram with 0.50% (m/m) methanol. The inset plot shows the absorbance spectrum of methanol, which is distinct from water and oxygen.

Methanol Headspace Analysis

As shown in Figure 2, after the initial screening, the methanol percent range of 0.01% – 0.50% was examined and the method detections limits were found to be below 0.005%. The experiment was done again with calibration standards at 0.5%, 0.1% and 0.01%, in triplicate, and the curve was found to be linear (Figure 3). This analysis demonstrates that methanol headspace analysis can be carried out in multiple fuel sources.

Shows 0.50% – 0.005% (m/m) of methanol in biodiesel. Under the current method conditions, methanol can be observed below 0.005%.

Figure 2. Shows 0.50% – 0.005% (m/m) of methanol in biodiesel. Under the current method conditions, methanol can be observed below 0.005%.

Shows a triplicate calibration curve covering 0.01%-0.50% (m/m), similar to the calibration curve used in the EN 14110 method, with an r2 of 0.998.

Figure 3. Shows a triplicate calibration curve covering 0.01%-0.50% (m/m), similar to the calibration curve used in the EN 14110 method, with an r2 of 0.998.

This information has been sourced, reviewed and adapted from materials provided by VUV Analytics.

For more information on this source, please visit VUV Analytics.

Citations

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

  • APA

    VUV Analytics. (2019, October 18). Developing Fuel Analysis to Detect Methanol in Biodiesel. AZoM. Retrieved on September 22, 2020 from https://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=18512.

  • MLA

    VUV Analytics. "Developing Fuel Analysis to Detect Methanol in Biodiesel". AZoM. 22 September 2020. <https://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=18512>.

  • Chicago

    VUV Analytics. "Developing Fuel Analysis to Detect Methanol in Biodiesel". AZoM. https://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=18512. (accessed September 22, 2020).

  • Harvard

    VUV Analytics. 2019. Developing Fuel Analysis to Detect Methanol in Biodiesel. AZoM, viewed 22 September 2020, https://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=18512.

Tell Us What You Think

Do you have a review, update or anything you would like to add to this article?

Leave your feedback
Submit