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Results 1 - 10 of 40 for Afterburners
  • Supplier Profile
    Since 1980 Baker Furnace has been an industry leader in the design and manufacture of pollution control equipment and furnaces such as Thermal Oxidizers, Catalytic Oxidizers, Afterburners, Industrial...
  • Supplier Profile
    For over 40 years, Stelter & Brinck has designed and manufactured direct and indirect air heaters, thermal and catalytic oxidizers, afterburners, fume incinerators, and tundish and ladle...
  • Supplier Profile
    The CARBOLITE GERO brand is synonymous with high quality, leading heat technology in the design and manufacture of laboratory and industrial ovens and furnaces ranging from 30 °C to 3000 °C...
  • Supplier Profile
    H.C. Starck Solutions converts technology metal powders: molybdenum (Mo), niobium (Nb), tantalum (Ta) and tungsten (W) into semi-finished, finished, and customer-specific products through production...
  • Supplier Profile
    In 1936, the Laboratory Equipment Company introduced the first rapid carbon determinator to the American iron and steel industry. Today, 75 years later, LECO is recognized globally as a leader in...
  • Supplier Profile
    Inciner8 are a globally respected manufacturing organisation offering a range of Incinerators for all applications in the waste management industry, their products are specifically designed with clean...
  • Article - 29 Apr 2011
    Emisshield is a high emissivity ceramic material. When applied to the afterburner of a ceramics manufacturing operation, the coating reduced fuel consumption by 23% due tot he performance gains...
  • News - 19 Feb 2014
    The ABF 8/28 from Carbolite is a powerful and extremely robust ashing furnace with an integral afterburner, which offers additional features to those of the standard ashing furnace. Typical...
  • Article - 8 Aug 2017
    Graphite is a soft, slippery, greyish-black material that has a metallic luster. It is opaque to light and is a good conductor of electricity and heat.
  • News - 19 Feb 2007
    Imagine a car that accelerates from zero to sixty in 250 feet, and then rockets to 120 miles per hour in just one more inch. That's essentially what a collaboration of accelerator physicists...