Search

Results 621 - 628 of 628 for Ceramic forming processes
  • Article - 6 Mar 2001
    Excellent wear resistance, thermal shock resistance and high temperature properties make reaction bonded silicon carbide a logical choice for kiln and furnace furniture, wear and thrust bearings,...
  • Article - 21 Feb 2001
    Ceramic springs have been around as scientific novelty items since the 1970s, produced by a special processing technology. An early example, made at Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI) in the UK in the...
  • Article - 21 Feb 2001
    Corrosion can be defined as the electrochemical reaction of a material with its environment which results in a degradation of the properties of the metal. It is a redox process.
  • Article - 14 Feb 2001
    Refractories are defined and aspects such as refractoriness, operating conditions, porosity and forms are explored. Their application in furnace linings is also explained.
  • Article - 12 Feb 2001
    Boron nitride comes in two forms, hexagonal and cubic boron nitrides. Both are syntheised in different ways. Hexagonal boron nitride is similar in many ways to graphite, while cubic boron nitride...
  • Article - 6 Feb 2001
    Magnesia is a highly refractory ceramic material. Applications include refractory bricks and shapes, crucibles, cements, heating elements, crushable bushes, thermocouple tubes, brake linings, plasma...
  • Article - 6 Feb 2001
    Aluminium Oxide (Al2O3) or alumina is one of the most versatile of refractory ceramic oxides and finds use in a wide range of applications.
  • Article - 13 Nov 2000
    Extreme hardness, low density and excellent thermal shock resistance are properties that make sintered silicon carbide suited to applications in industries including: automotive; ballistics; heat...