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Results 1 - 10 of 22 for Cesium iodide
  • Article - 24 Jan 2004
    Caesium Iodide (CsI) is hygroscopic and readily dissolves in water. Its properties and applications, which mainly involve infrared applications are briefly discussed.
  • Supplier Profile
    Scintacor is a world leader in phosphor and scintillation technologies. Our products allow the conversion of many different radiations into light for imaging and detection applications. Scintacor...
  • Supplier Profile
    Delmic is a passionate high-tech company based in Delft, the Netherlands that develops powerful and user-friendly solutions for light and electron microscopy. At Delmic, we believe that imaging...
  • Supplier Profile
    Goodfellow supplies metals, ceramics and other materials to meet the research, development and specialist production requirements of science and industry worldwide. The Goodfellow group consists of...
  • News - 8 Jul 2020
    Researchers in the Cava Group at the Princeton University Department of Chemistry have demystified the reasons for instability in an inorganic perovskite that has attracted wide attention for its...
  • News - 8 Jul 2020
    Instability in inorganic perovskites has attracted a great deal of interest for its potential to produce highly efficient solar cells. Scientists working in the Cava Group from the Department of...
  • News - 13 Jul 2020
    Solar cells made of perovskite are at the center of much recent solar research. The material is cheap, easy to produce and almost as efficient as silicon, the material traditionally used in solar...
  • News - 8 Feb 2009
    Phosphor and scintillator detector specialist, Applied Scintillation Technologies (AST), has upgraded its measurement and quality assurance equipment for its caesium iodide (CsI) production facility...
  • Article - 26 Nov 2020
    In this interview, AZoM talks to Ed Bullard and Martin Lewis, CEO and Principal Engineer at Scintacor respectively, about Scintacor, the companies products, capabilities, and vision for the future.
  • News - 30 Sep 2014
    Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington have developed a new method for creating transparent nanoscintillators for the detection of radiation. They heated lanthanum, yttrium and oxygen...