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Results 1 - 10 of 139 for Guide Rolls
  • Supplier Profile
    The NETZSCH Group is a mid-sized, family-owned German company engaging in the manufacture of machinery and instrumentation with worldwide production, sales, and service branches. The three Business...
  • Supplier Profile
    With over thirty years experience in the production and development of advanced technical ceramics, International Syalons are experts in the field. We are the UK's leading manufacturer of sialon...
  • Supplier Profile
    Precitech began operations in 1992, but continues the rich history of ultra-precision machine tool building dating back to 1962, when Pneumo Precision was founded. In October of 1997, the Pneumo...
  • Supplier Profile
    Cincinnati Test Systems (CTS) is a world leader in the design and manufacture of standard and custom leak test systems and machines. Leak testing is critical to ensuring proper product quality,...
  • Article - 5 Nov 2008
    This article provides examples of industries and applications that can benefit from the use of advanced ceramic components. IN many cases advanced ceramics can replace more traditional materials and...
  • Supplier Profile
    The Technical Ceramics business of Morgan Advanced Materials engineers and manufactures high performance functional and structural ceramic materials, components and sub-assemblies to address...
  • Equipment
    Morgan Advanced Materials uses their advanced ceramic materials to manufacture high performance welding rolls and guides for HF-ERW.
  • Article - 24 Sep 2001
    Although production costs for composite materials (polymer, ceramic and metal matrix) are coming down, it is difficult for them to become accepted materials for aeroengine applications. Thus article...
  • News - 16 Oct 2008
    A two-strand rod mill originally designed to produce low carbon and medium carbon steel for Wuhan Iron & Steel has successfully been upgraded by Siemens VAI. The mill designed to produce 700,000...
  • Article - 7 May 2002
    Niobium was first discovered by Hatchett in 1801, but this metal was produced only in 1864, when Blomstrand reduced niobium chloride.