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Results 1 - 10 of 218 for Lab-on-a-chip devices
  • Supplier Profile
    Levicron is a Germany based developer and manufacturer of high-speed tooling and work-holding motor spindles using patented non-contact bearing technologies like aerostatic or hydrostatic bearing...
  • Supplier Profile
    Bruker Optics, part of the Bruker Corporation is one of the world’s leading manufacturer and worldwide supplier of Fourier Transform Infrared, Near Infrared and Raman...
  • Supplier Profile
    Founded in 1991 by a group of managers and engineers from Tesla with its electron microscopy history starting in the 1950’s, today TESCAN is a globally renowned supplier of Focused Ion Beam...
  • Supplier Profile
    Labthink International, Inc. is a global enterprise that provides professional quality control solutions for packaging materials and products. Labthink's headquarters is based in Greater...
  • Article - 3 Jul 2007
    The use of bioceramics in medical applications is on the increase. This is in part due to the expanding range of materials they encompass, which is in turn influenced by new materials and processing...
  • News - 19 Apr 2010
    A small blood lab that fits into the pocket of a jacket can quickly analyze the risk of blood clots in legs prior to a long distance flight; a sensor wristband for measuring electric smog can warn...
  • Article - 10 Feb 2016
    This article deals with the accurate and quick measurements of depth, flatness and width, of closed channel microfluidic devices following fabrication.
  • Article - 6 Feb 2018
    How scientists developing new technologies for photonic and quantum-information applications used the LatticeAx.
  • News - 19 Jun 2017
    Miniaturized devices such as microsensors often require an independent, equally miniaturized power supply. Searching for suitable systems, Japanese scientists have now developed a fully integrated...
  • News - 23 Nov 2008
    A team at Rice University has figured out that a strip of graphite only 10 atoms thick can be broken with a jolt of electric current -- and repaired with another. Over and over. That's called a...