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Results 361 - 370 of 371 for Nuclear reactors
  • Article - 7 Jun 2013
    Stainless steel 15 – 5 PH, also known as XM-12 or UNS S15500, is a modification of 17-4 PH developed in the 1960s. It has a more refined microstructure obtained through the remelting process.
  • Article - 6 Jun 2013
    Vanadium is a hard, ductile metal having a silvery-gray appearance. It is harder than most metals and exhibits good corrosion resistance against alkalis and acids. Its atomic number is 23 and is...
  • Article - 4 Jun 2013
    Cadmium is a soft, bluish white metal that can be easily cut with a knife. Its chemical symbol is Cd and atomic number is 48. It has similar characteristics as zinc and mercury. It tarnishes when...
  • Article - 4 Jun 2013
    Beryllium is a chemical element with atomic number 4, represented by the chemical symbol ‘Be’. It is a toxic, bivalent element having a steel gray appearance. It is a lightweight metal having very...
  • Article - 1 Jun 2013
    Antimony is a chemical element with Sb as its symbol. It belongs to group 15, periodic number 5 of the periodic table. The metallic form of this element is bright, silvery, and brittle. The Mohs scale...
  • Article - 22 Oct 2012
    In 1978, beryllium was discovered by Abbe Rene-Just Hauy. It is a fairly soft metal, brittle in nature, and has high ductility, specific heat, stiffness-to-weight ratio, strength-to-weight ratio and...
  • Article - 10 Sep 2012
    Stainless steels are known as high-alloy steels. They contain about 4-30% of chromium. They are further divided into martensitic, austenitic, and ferritic steels. Another group of stainless steels are...
  • Article - 10 Jul 2008
    The experimental determination of GB or IB diffusion coefficients is very similar to that for the corresponding bulk diffusion, the main difference being the relation between penetration and diffuser...
  • Article - 9 Jul 2013
    Pyromet 718 is a precipitation hardenable nickel-base alloy that exhibits exceptionally high yield, tensile and creep-rupture properties at temperatures up to 704°C (1300°F). The alloy allows...
  • Article - 3 Mar 2006
    Silicon Carbide is one of the hardest of ceramics & retains hardness at elevated temperatures, which translates into the best wear resistance.