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Results 1 - 10 of 706 for Sn
  • Article - 30 Jan 2002
    Titanium alloys can be classified either by structure or strength. The main structures are alpha, beta and alpha-beta, which are described. Different strength classifications also exist, and this is...
  • Article - 2 Apr 2002
    Physical properties of titanium and titanium alloys such as density strength, thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, magnetic properties, elastic modulus, poissons ratio, tensile strength,...
  • Article - 6 Jun 2013
    Tin is a silvery, soft and pliable metal which resists corrosion. The atomic number of tin is 50 and it is a period 4, group 4 element in the periodic table. The chemical name for tin is stannum and...
  • Article - 17 Feb 2004
    Tin/Silver alloys were developed as solders as an alternative to lead-containing solders. Their properties and applications are outlined.
  • Article - 13 Feb 2004
    The Gold 80/Tin 20 eutectic alloy is used as a solder and for packaging of microelectronics, photonics and optoelectronics. The properties that make it suited to these applications are outlined.
  • Article - 29 Jul 2001
    Tin (Sn) is mostly found in cassiterite (SnO2) and has been known since ancient times. It is obtained by reducing the ore with coal in a reverberatory furnace.
  • Article - 7 Feb 2001
    Bronzes (sometimes called phosphor bronzes) are alloys of copper and tin. While best known for their historical value they are used for self lubricating bearings, pumps, valves, electrical contacts...
  • Article - 7 Feb 2001
    Also known as cupro-nickels, they have compositions from 10% nickel to 45% nickel. Due to the large range of alloys, they display a range of different properties and applications. This article...
  • Article - 30 Aug 2002
    Laser forming is a deposition process which can produce titanium parts directly from CAD drawings. It has advantages over casting and machining in certain applications. The process, advantages,...
  • Article - 14 Mar 2006
    This article demonstrates that it is possible to overcome the problem of low activity of grafted zirconocene catalysts by the previous chemical modification of the silica surface with SnCl4.