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Researchers Use Sophisticated 3D Imaging to Track Exploding Lithium-Ion Batteries

Researchers Use Sophisticated 3D Imaging to Track Exploding Lithium-Ion Batteries

Researchers have used advanced 3D imaging to show how Li-ion batteries explode they are overheated. The study was a collaborative effort of University College of London (UCL), the National Physical Laboratory, ESRF The European Synchrotron, and Imperial College London. [More]
Transparent Light Shutters Switch Between Opaque and Transparent States

Transparent Light Shutters Switch Between Opaque and Transparent States

A research team at Pusan National University in South Korea has developed transparent light shutters using a new liquid crystal technology. [More]
Sir Martin Wood Science Prize Winners for China Announced by Oxford Instruments

Sir Martin Wood Science Prize Winners for China Announced by Oxford Instruments

Oxford Instruments is delighted to announce Dr Jian WANG from Peking University and Dr Shiyan LI from Fudan University as the joint winners of the 2015 Sir Martin Wood Science Prize for China. [More]
Boron Nitride Encapsulation Improves Performance of 2D Semiconductor

Boron Nitride Encapsulation Improves Performance of 2D Semiconductor

Researchers at the Japanese National Institute of Materials Science, Danish Technical University, Yonsei University in Korea, University of Minnesota, Cornell, Harvard and Columbia Engineering have improved the performance of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a 2D material by encapsulating it in an insulating material, boron nitride (BN). [More]
Renishaw Raman Systems Used to Study 2D Materials at Boston University

Renishaw Raman Systems Used to Study 2D Materials at Boston University

Anna Swan is an associate Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, and one of the three directors running the multi-disciplinary lab at Boston University. The research group is currently focusing on 2D materials, such as graphene, boron nitride, molybdenum disulphide and phosphorene. [More]
Brookhaven Scientists Develop Eco-friendly Sulfur Polymer Technology that Replaces Concrete

Brookhaven Scientists Develop Eco-friendly Sulfur Polymer Technology that Replaces Concrete

SulfCrete in association with the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, have developed a distinct and inexpensive construction material - sulfur polymer having a lower carbon footprint than present concrete materials. [More]
New Magnetic Alloy Holds Promise as an Alternative to High-Performance Rare-Earth Permanent Magnets

New Magnetic Alloy Holds Promise as an Alternative to High-Performance Rare-Earth Permanent Magnets

Karl A. Gschneidner and fellow scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory have created a new magnetic alloy that is an alternative to traditional rare-earth permanent magnets. [More]
Researchers Develop New Three-Atomic-Layer-Thick Semiconducting Material with Exotic Properties

Researchers Develop New Three-Atomic-Layer-Thick Semiconducting Material with Exotic Properties

Researchers have successfully created a new three-atomic-layer-thick semiconducting material. The novel material has electronic properties better than conventional semiconductors. The material’s two nano-engineered configurations have exhibited improved light response. [More]
New Technique Directly Prints Silicon on Paper Using Excimer Laser

New Technique Directly Prints Silicon on Paper Using Excimer Laser

Researchers from Delft University of Technology, in the Netherlands have formulated a fabrication method which allows silicon in polycrystalline form as found in circuitry to be manufactured directly on a substrate using liquid silicon ink along with a single laser pulse. This new method has the potential to outbeat all other recently created ultra-thin substitutes. [More]
Magnet-Based Particle Detector Determines Neutrino Mass

Magnet-Based Particle Detector Determines Neutrino Mass

MIT scientists have created a new particle detector that identifies individual electrons in a radioactive gas. When the gas produces electrons after decay, this new tabletop detector traps them in a magnetic bottle using a magnet. The weak signals produced by the electrons are collected by a radio antenna in order to precisely map the activity of the electrons over several milliseconds. [More]