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Self-Moving Alcohol Droplets for Drug Delivery Applications

Self-Moving Alcohol Droplets for Drug Delivery Applications

Droplets are tiny spherical drops of fluid that are incapable of moving on its own. However, researchers from Southern Denmark University and Institute of Chemical Technology, Czech Republic have succeeded in making alcohol droplets move in water. They believe that this invention may serve as a breakthrough in potential applications of drug delivery. [More]
Researchers to Develop Multi-Component Catalyst Materials with Greater Efficiency

Researchers to Develop Multi-Component Catalyst Materials with Greater Efficiency

Researchers from multiple institutions have joined together in an endeavor to develop better multicomponent catalytic processes and materials for producing more effective and cost-effective materials such as polymers and chemicals. The National Science Foundation has awarded nearly $1.5 million for this project under the Designing Materials to Revolutionize and Engineer our Future initiative. [More]
New Battery Prototype Using Biomaterials and Smart Recycling Strategy

New Battery Prototype Using Biomaterials and Smart Recycling Strategy

Scientists working at Ångström Laboratory at the Uppsala University, Sweden have developed a new environment-friendly battery prototype using resources from pine resin and alfalfa (lucerne seed) coupled with a smart recycling approach. Their concept could very well become an alternate option to present-day lithium batteries that have its share of environmental issues. [More]
NIST Researchers Use STEM Imaging to Explore Tiny Multi-Layer Batteries

NIST Researchers Use STEM Imaging to Explore Tiny Multi-Layer Batteries

NIST researchers have created a new technique to investigate the complex internal structures of microscopic batteries. [More]
Specialised Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometer Can Detect Lighter Elements

Specialised Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometer Can Detect Lighter Elements

Researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie (HZB) have developed a specialised wavelength dispersive spectrometer which can help to accurately detect light elements when using an electron microscope. [More]
A New Solid-State Platform for High-Throughput ChIP

A New Solid-State Platform for High-Throughput ChIP

Porvair Sciences, in conjunction with researchers at Swansea University (UK) have written a new technical article entitled 'Chromatrap® 96: a new solid-state platform for high-throughput Chromatin Immun... [More]
Utah Engineers Create Topological Insulators with Large Energy Gap

Utah Engineers Create Topological Insulators with Large Energy Gap

Engineers at the University of Utah have found a new way to produce “topological insulators”, which possess a large energy gap. This study has been led by Feng Liu, a materials science and engineering professor, at the University of Utah. Topological insulators could help develop superfast computers that do not get over heated when performing hi-speed calculations. [More]
Phase-Change Materials Set to Replace Silicon Computer Parts

Phase-Change Materials Set to Replace Silicon Computer Parts

Phase-Change Materials (PCMs), which have been around since the 1960s when they were used in optical-memory devices, are currently being adapted for electronic-memory operations and are set to replace silicon-aided flash memory in smartphones. [More]
Researchers Establish Chemical Bond between Superheavy Element and Carbon Atom

Researchers Establish Chemical Bond between Superheavy Element and Carbon Atom

A group of researchers from Mainz and Darmstadt have established a chemical bond between a carbon atom and a superheavy element for the first time ever. The researchers established a chemical bond between seaborgium and a carbon atom by converting eighteen atoms of seaborgium into seaborgium hexacarbonyl complexes. [More]
Modified Fullerenes Alter Electrode Work Function for High-Efficiency Solar Cells

Modified Fullerenes Alter Electrode Work Function for High-Efficiency Solar Cells

University of Massachusetts, Amherst researchers have designed a light-weight, highly efficient and easily processable solar cell that can use almost any metal as the electrode, successfully impairing the so-called ‘electrode barrier’. [More]