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Picosun and Carleton Strike Gold with ALD

Picosun and Carleton Strike Gold with ALD

Picosun Oy, the leading provider of high quality Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) solutions for industrial manufacturing, and Carleton University, Canada, report uniform ALD gold deposition on complete silicon wafers. [More]
MIT Spinout LiquiGlide Licenses its Nonstick Coating to Major Consumer-Goods Company

MIT Spinout LiquiGlide Licenses its Nonstick Coating to Major Consumer-Goods Company

MIT’s Kripa Varanasi and David Smith developed a liquid-impregnated coating known as LiquiGlide that serves as a slippery barrier between a viscous liquid and a surface in 2009. The coating technology has now been licensed to a major consumer-goods company. [More]
New Methods for Characterizing 3D Macroporous Hydrogels for ‘Smart’ Materials

New Methods for Characterizing 3D Macroporous Hydrogels for ‘Smart’ Materials

Chemists at Professor Krzysztof Matyjaszewski’s lab at Carnegie Mellon University have developed novel methods for characterizing 3D macroporous hydrogels (3DOM hydrogels), which could enable development of new “smart” responsive materials. These materials could be used for various applications, including tissue engineering scaffolds, chemical detectors, carbon capture absorbents, and as catalysts. [More]
Collaborative Research Study Explains Formation of Glass at the Molecular Level

Collaborative Research Study Explains Formation of Glass at the Molecular Level

A research team including a physicist at the University of Waterloo has explained the formation of glass at the molecular level, thus providing a potential solution to a long-standing problem. [More]
MRI Imaging of Plants Could Help Design New Engineering Materials

MRI Imaging of Plants Could Help Design New Engineering Materials

Researchers from the University of Freiburg, Germany, have developed a new method that utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for visualizing the load-induced deformations that occur at the junction between a plant’s stems and its branches. This junction, called as plant ramifications, could provide new insights towards designing new lightweight, fibre-reinforced, branched materials for a wide range of applications including architecture, airplanes, cars and bicycles. [More]
Ultrafast Electron-Based Imaging Technique Holds Promise for Designing Improved Semiconductors

Ultrafast Electron-Based Imaging Technique Holds Promise for Designing Improved Semiconductors

Researchers at Michigan State University have developed an ultrafast electron-based imaging technique that makes it possible to modify the electronic properties of materials such that easy transmission of an electrical current is made possible. [More]
Electrothermal Offers Free ‘Burn-Off’ Process for New Electromantles

Electrothermal Offers Free ‘Burn-Off’ Process for New Electromantles

Bibby Scientific announced that Electrothermal, the world’s leading manufacturer of heating mantles, now provides a free “burn-off” process for all new Electromantles® prior to shipping. This allows lab scientists to use their Electrothermal mantles immediately for safe and reliable heating of chemicals and liquids in vessels of various shapes and sizes. [More]
Controlling the Behaviour of Complex Oxide Materials Using Helium 'Balloon' Ions

Controlling the Behaviour of Complex Oxide Materials Using Helium 'Balloon' Ions

A team of researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed an innovative and simple method which uses helium atoms to control the behaviour of a range of complex oxide materials. [More]
New Berkeley Center for Magnet Technology Brings Together R&D Expertise

New Berkeley Center for Magnet Technology Brings Together R&D Expertise

The new Berkeley Center for Magnet Technology (BCMT) aims to develop advanced magnetic systems by bringing together experts in research and development from across Berkeley Lab. [More]
New Study Aids Development of Crack-Resistant Materials for Industrial Applications

New Study Aids Development of Crack-Resistant Materials for Industrial Applications

A research team led by Karl Sieradzki, materials science and engineering professor in Arizona State University, has provided new insights into the causes of stress-corrosion cracking in components employed in aircraft framework and nuclear-power-generating stations as well as in metal alloys employed in pipelines for transportation of fossil fuels, natural gas and water. [More]