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Wearer-Controlled Eyeglasses Can Switch from Plain to Shaded

Wearer-Controlled Eyeglasses Can Switch from Plain to Shaded

A group of Georgia Tech researchers have designed eyeglasses which can change from clear to shaded under the wearer's control, rather than based on ambient light conditions. [More]
Researchers Use MakerBot® Replicator® 2X Experimental 3D Printer to Create Custom Tracheal Scaffolding

Researchers Use MakerBot® Replicator® 2X Experimental 3D Printer to Create Custom Tracheal Scaffolding

Using a MakerBot® Replicator® 2X Experimental 3D Printer, a research team from The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research has produced cartilage meant for tracheal repair or replacement. This medical breakthrough has been showcased at the 51st Annual Meeting of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons in San Diego via a presentation by one of the researchers Todd Goldstein, a PhD candidate. [More]
RSC Thermal Methods Group to Celebrate 50th Anniversary Conference on March 30 – April 1, 2015

RSC Thermal Methods Group to Celebrate 50th Anniversary Conference on March 30 – April 1, 2015

Founded 50 years ago, 2015 sees the 50th Anniversary Meeting of the Thermal Methods Group, a sub-group of the Analytical Division of the Royal Society of Chemistry. It will be celebrated with a three day conference at Churchill College Cambridge with leading speakers from all over Europe. [More]
Self-Assembling Amyloid Fibers from Smaller Proteins for Nanotechnology Applications

Self-Assembling Amyloid Fibers from Smaller Proteins for Nanotechnology Applications

A research team from UC Davis and Rice University has discovered a technique that would enable natural proteins to self-assemble into amyloid fibrils. Nature has several instances of self-assembly, and researchers have always been interested in replicating or manipulating these proteins to develop novel and practical materials or devices. The team’s research findings have been published online by the journal ACS Nano. [More]
Solid Nature of Glass Identified with Computer Simulations or Atomic Movements

Solid Nature of Glass Identified with Computer Simulations or Atomic Movements

Scientists from Kyoto University and the University of Bristol have harnessed information theory and computer simulation to solve the long-running mystery of whether glass ever stops flowing. [More]
New Study on Exotic Properties of Ferromagnetic Topological Insulators

New Study on Exotic Properties of Ferromagnetic Topological Insulators

Over the last decade, one of the most potential findings in the field of condensed matter physics is the presence of "topologically protected" electrical conductivity on the surface of certain materials, whose bulk interior behaves as an insulating material, resulting in new potential applications and various unusual electronic states. Most of these phenomena, however, have not yet been studied properly. [More]
Researchers at the University of Rochester Create Super-Hydrophobic Metals Using Laser Technique

Researchers at the University of Rochester Create Super-Hydrophobic Metals Using Laser Technique

A research team from the University of Rochester have successfully used lasers in order to produce super-hydrophobic metals without the use of conventional temporary coating techniques. [More]
Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases New Application Note: “AFM Applications in Polymer Science and Engineering”

Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases New Application Note: “AFM Applications in Polymer Science and Engineering”

Oxford Instruments Asylum Research has released a new application note, “AFM Applications in Polymer Science and Engineering,” written by former NIST researcher Dr. Donna Hurley. [More]
LECO Corporation Expands Scope of Accreditation Within A2LA Program Guidelines

LECO Corporation Expands Scope of Accreditation Within A2LA Program Guidelines

LECO Corporation has broadened its accreditation for Reference Materials under the A2LA Accreditation Program for Reference Material Producers, in compliance with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). [More]
New Microscopic Technique Helps Resolve Performance Issues in Organic Semiconductors

New Microscopic Technique Helps Resolve Performance Issues in Organic Semiconductors

Organic semiconductors can be easily printed using solution, making them as an inexpensive, scalable substitute to silicon-based devices. They are employed in photovoltaic cells, field effect transistors, and LEDs. [More]