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NYU Researchers Use DNA-Coated Colloids to Form Multiple Ordered Compounds

NYU Researchers Use DNA-Coated Colloids to Form Multiple Ordered Compounds

A research team from the New York University has created a new method of producing ordered structures of microparticles in different materials. This method holds promise in enhancing the arrangement and color of optical materials employed in computer screens in addition to other consumer products. [More]
DVD Material Holds Promise as Ultrafast Light Switch for Optical Communication and Data Processing

DVD Material Holds Promise as Ultrafast Light Switch for Optical Communication and Data Processing

DVD material holds tremendous potential. This has been proven by an international research team, which has discovered that the material is suitable as a highly rapid light switch for data processing or optical communication. [More]
Black Phosphorus May Hold Promise as Replacement for Silicon Computer Chips

Black Phosphorus May Hold Promise as Replacement for Silicon Computer Chips

Researchers at the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics at Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU) in South Korea have developed a new semiconductor material from black phosphorus (BP), which holds promise as a replacement for silicon in future computer chips. [More]
Hydrophobic Surfaces Help Improve Catalytic Activity

Hydrophobic Surfaces Help Improve Catalytic Activity

Researchers at MIT and other institutes have identified that two processes previously thought to be unrelated, catalysis and wetting, are closely related to each other. This surprising result could help to identify new catalysts for specific applications. [More]
Study Results Provide Key Insights into Crystal Formation in Nature

Study Results Provide Key Insights into Crystal Formation in Nature

An international team of researchers, including a geoscientist from Virginia Tech, has demonstrated how nature employs different pathways for crystal growth that outperform the classical, one-atom-at-a-time route. [More]
Boxfish Skin Could Inspire New Materials for Body Armor, Robots and Flexible Electronics

Boxfish Skin Could Inspire New Materials for Body Armor, Robots and Flexible Electronics

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego have closely studied the armor of the boxfish, so its unique structure can be applied to creating robots, body armor and flexible electronics. [More]
Zeiss Celebrates the 50th Anniversary of the First Commercial Scanning Electron Microscope

Zeiss Celebrates the 50th Anniversary of the First Commercial Scanning Electron Microscope

ZEISS celebrates the 50th anniversary of commercial scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In 1965 the first commercial Stereoscan was built by Cambridge Instrument Company, a UK based predecessor company of Carl Zeiss Microscopy Ltd. [More]
Pyro-Magnetic-Optics Technology Holds Promise for New Thermographic Imaging Applications

Pyro-Magnetic-Optics Technology Holds Promise for New Thermographic Imaging Applications

A new technology developed by Kiel University scientists allows visual identification of even minute temperature differences at high spatial resolution, irrespective of the material. This novel concept reported in the current edition of Advanced Materials journal, challenges other similar procedures. [More]
Purdue Researchers Discover Sinuous Flow Deformation in Metals

Purdue Researchers Discover Sinuous Flow Deformation in Metals

Researchers at Purdue University have discovered sinuous flow deformation in metals, and an astonishingly simple method to suppress this deformation. This discovery could help advance manufacturing by increasing the efficiency of machining, and by reducing the energy and force required for metal processing. [More]
Computer Simulations Help Predict Material with Highest Known Melting Point

Computer Simulations Help Predict Material with Highest Known Melting Point

Brown University researchers have used robust computer simulations to predict that a combination of hafnium, tantalum, and carbon (Hf-Ta-C) could result in a material with a very high melting point of over 4400K or 7460°F, which is two-thirds the sun’s surface temperature. [More]