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Study Results Provide Key Insights into Crystal Formation in Nature

Study Results Provide Key Insights into Crystal Formation in Nature

An international team of researchers, including a geoscientist from Virginia Tech, has demonstrated how nature employs different pathways for crystal growth that outperform the classical, one-atom-at-a-time route. [More]
Complex, Scalable Arrays of Semiconductor Heterojunctions Hold Potential for Future Electronics

Complex, Scalable Arrays of Semiconductor Heterojunctions Hold Potential for Future Electronics

A team of researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Department of Energy, has integrated a new synthesis process with standard electron-beam lithography methods to create complex and scalable arrays of semiconductor heterojunctions in random patterns within a nanometer-thick semiconductor crystal. This unique process depends on converting patterned areas of a single-layer crystal into another layer of crystal. The study has been published in Nature Communications. [More]
Researchers Develop First Transistor Made of Black Arsenic Phosphorus

Researchers Develop First Transistor Made of Black Arsenic Phosphorus

A team of international researchers has developed the first field effect transistor made of semiconducting black arsenic phosphorus in which arsenic replaces individual phosphorus atoms. [More]
Laser-Induced Micro-Explosions Create New, Exotic Materials

Laser-Induced Micro-Explosions Create New, Exotic Materials

A team of researchers has developed a novel technique to make new, exotic materials using ultra-short laser-induced micro-explosions in silicon. Silicon is a material that is generally used in computer chips. The research team successfully focused lasers onto silicon which was embedded deep inside a clear silicon dioxide layer and blasted small cavities in the solid silicon reliably. The study has been published in Nature Communications. [More]
Macromolecules Self-Assemble from Metastable, Supersaturated Solution into Crystals

Macromolecules Self-Assemble from Metastable, Supersaturated Solution into Crystals

The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. [More]
Exploiting the Effectiveness of Pressure for Studying the Structure-Property Relationship of Molecular Materials

Exploiting the Effectiveness of Pressure for Studying the Structure-Property Relationship of Molecular Materials

A team of researchers has shown that pressure provides a new way to produce novel phases and helps in investigating the links between structures and properties of molecular materials. [More]
Researchers at Princeton University Observe Hall Effect in 'Frustrated Magnets'

Researchers at Princeton University Observe Hall Effect in 'Frustrated Magnets'

Researchers at Princeton University have performed an experiment which has demonstrated the Hall Effect in a group of quantum materials known as 'frustrated magnets'. [More]
Single Protein Species Could Produce Specific Effects on Crystal Structure Formation

Single Protein Species Could Produce Specific Effects on Crystal Structure Formation

Researchers in Saarbr├╝cken and Haifa have shown that a single protein species can produce explicit effects on crystal structure formation. [More]
Study Reveals How Chameleons Control Nanocrystals to Change Color

Study Reveals How Chameleons Control Nanocrystals to Change Color

A research team from the Sections of Biology and Physics of the Faculty of Science from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, has discovered the mechanisms that control and regulate the rapid and complex color changes in chameleons. Many chameleons display this phenomenon during social interactions. The research has been published in Nature Communications. [More]
Solid Nature of Glass Identified with Computer Simulations of Atomic Movements

Solid Nature of Glass Identified with Computer Simulations of Atomic Movements

Scientists from Kyoto University and the University of Bristol have harnessed information theory and computer simulation to solve the long-running mystery of whether glass ever stops flowing. [More]