Materials Analysis News RSS Feed - Materials Analysis

Boxfish Skin Could Inspire New Materials for Body Armor, Robots and Flexible Electronics

Boxfish Skin Could Inspire New Materials for Body Armor, Robots and Flexible Electronics

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego have closely studied the armor of the boxfish, so its unique structure can be applied to creating robots, body armor and flexible electronics. [More]
New SENresearch Spectroscopic Ellipsometer SENTECH Offers 10x Faster Measurements

New SENresearch Spectroscopic Ellipsometer SENTECH Offers 10x Faster Measurements

SENTECH offers leading edge ellipsometers for thin film metrology and plasma equipment for etching and deposition. The SENresearch family represents the high end of SENTECH spectroscopic ellipsometers and includes the unique combination of FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) spectroscopy and multiplex diode array spectrometry for spectroscopic ellipsometry. [More]
LabDCT Diffraction Contrast Tomography Now Available on Xradia 520 Versa - Unlocking Crystallographic Information in Your Lab

LabDCT Diffraction Contrast Tomography Now Available on Xradia 520 Versa - Unlocking Crystallographic Information in Your Lab

The first laboratory-based diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) system for 3D grain imaging was launched today by Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, a pioneer in bringing synchrotron imaging capabilities to the researcher's laboratory. [More]
Zeiss Celebrates the 50th Anniversary of the First Commercial Scanning Electron Microscope

Zeiss Celebrates the 50th Anniversary of the First Commercial Scanning Electron Microscope

ZEISS celebrates the 50th anniversary of commercial scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In 1965 the first commercial Stereoscan was built by Cambridge Instrument Company, a UK based predecessor company of Carl Zeiss Microscopy Ltd. [More]
Rigaku Analytical Devices Launches Katana Handheld Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Analyzer

Rigaku Analytical Devices Launches Katana Handheld Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Analyzer

Rigaku Analytical Devices, a leading pioneer of handheld and portable spectroscopic analyzers, has announced the launch of Katana™, a handheld laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analyzer. Katana enables durable and accurate alloy identification for use in scrap metal sorting, quality assurance in metal fabrication, and positive material identification in petrochemical operations. [More]

Alfa Aesar’s West Coast Distribution Center is Thriving

In September 2013, Alfa Aesar, a Johnson Matthey Company, opened the 110,000 square foot distribution center in Sparks, Nevada. This distribution center opened to serve the western states of California, Arizona, Nevada, Washington, Oregon, Utah and Idaho. Alfa Aesar continues to see increased demand from our West Coast customers. [More]
Asynt Expands DrySyn Vortex Family with Effective Parallel Stirrer / Blenders

Asynt Expands DrySyn Vortex Family with Effective Parallel Stirrer / Blenders

The DrySyn Vortex family from Asynt has been expanded to now comprise three systems, all designed to stir or blend up to three reactions at one time, whilst heating or cooling. [More]

ZEISS Highlights Range of Microscopes and Imaging Solutions at M&M 2015

ZEISS announces it will be highlighting a wide range of precision microscopes, imaging solutions, and software at M&M 2015, the Microscopy & Microanalysis 2015 Meeting, which will be held August 2-6, 2015 at the ... [More]
Computer Simulations Help Predict Material with Highest Known Melting Point

Computer Simulations Help Predict Material with Highest Known Melting Point

Brown University researchers have used robust computer simulations to predict that a combination of hafnium, tantalum, and carbon (Hf-Ta-C) could result in a material with a very high melting point of over 4400K or 7460°F, which is two-thirds the sun’s surface temperature. [More]
Ultrafast Plasmonic Device Could Form the Basis for Optical Computers

Ultrafast Plasmonic Device Could Form the Basis for Optical Computers

A team of researchers at Duke University has developed an ultrafast plasmonic device, which can turn on and off 90 billion times per second. [More]