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Results 391 - 400 of 411 for Metal Mining
  • Article - 13 Sep 2001
    The 316 family is a group of austenitic stainless steels with superior corrosion resistance to 304 stainless steels. They also have excellent toughness and can be used in the food, marine, chemical...
  • Article - 20 Aug 2001
    Properties such as low density, good strength at elevated temperatures, high strength and excellent corrosion resistance have seen titanium used extensively in industries such as aerospace, process...
  • Article - 16 Aug 2001
    Non-oxide ceramics such as silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminium nitride and titanium diboride posess unique properties that allow them to perform under extreme conditions.
  • Article - 30 Jul 2001
    Iron (Fe) is a metal that has been known since ancient times. In fact, the Earth’s crust is made up of 5% of iron, which is the second most abundant metal after aluminum.
  • Article - 28 Jul 2001
    Tungsten has the highest melting point (3410°C) and the highest tensile strength at temperatures over 1650°C of all the metals. It is used for lamp filaments, x-ray targets, aerospace applications and...
  • Article - 28 Jul 2001
    Although lead occurs as such in nature, it is rare. Lead is chiefly obtained from galena (PbS) through the process of roasting.
  • Article - 23 Jul 2001
    Uranium is a heavy, silver-white metal resembling nickel. It is malleable, ductile, slightly paramagnetic and pyrophoric when finely divided. Its main uses are as a nuclear fuel, radioactive isotope...
  • Article - 20 Jul 2001
    In its pure state chromium is a steel-silvery grey with bluish tinge lustre. It is an extremely hard metal that takes a high polish. As a coating it has no capilliary action to oil and water. Its main...
  • Article - 20 Jul 2001
    Bismuth is one of few metals that increase in volume upon solidification. It is the most diamagnetic of metals and has the second lowest thermal conductivity. Uses are catalysts, fire protection,...
  • Article - 20 Jul 2001
    In 1817, German chemist Friedrich Strohmeyer discovered cadmium from an impurity of zinc carbonate (ZnCO3). Cadmium derives from the Latin term ‘cadmia’ and the Greek word ‘kadmeia’, which are ancient...

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