Microscopy Books

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Microscopy Books
Scanning Probe Microscopy brings up to date a constantly growing knowledge base of electrical and electromechanical characterization at the nanoscale. This comprehensive, two-volume set presents practical and theoretical issues of advanced scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques ranging from fundamental physical studies to device characterization, failure analysis, and nanofabrication.
Since 2004 the Springer Handbook of Nanotechnology has established itself as the definitive reference in the nanoscience and nanotechnology area. It integrates the knowledge from nanofabrication, nanodevices, nanomechanics, Nanotribology, materials science, and reliability engineering in just one volume.
The volumes V, VI and VII examine the physical and technical foundation for recent progress in applied scanning probe techniques. The first volume came out in January 2004 and the second to fourth volumes in early 2006. The field is progressing so fast that there is a need for a set of volumes every 12 to 18 months to capture latest developments. These volumes constitute a timely comprehensive overview of SPM applications. After introducing scanning probe microscopy, including sensor technology and tip characterization, chapters on use in various industrial applications are presented. Industrial applications span topographic and dynamical surface studies of thin-film semiconductors, polymers, paper, ceramics, and magnetic and biological materials. The chapters have been written by leading researchers and application scientists from all over the world and from various industries to provide a broader perspective.
In Science of Microscopy, comprehensive reviews set innovations in the context of microscopy today. Each contribution presents a form of microscopy or occasionally a microscopic technique, and provides information about the instruments involved and their areas of application. The contributions are written in such a way that the reader can understand how the various instruments function, their strengths and weaknesses, and whether they are suitable for a particular scientific investigation. Science of Microscopy will be an indispensable guide to both a wide range of scientists in university laboratories and to engineers and scientists in industrial R&D departments.
In the past twenty years, powerful tools such as atomic force microscopy have made it possible to accurately investigate the phenomena of friction and wear, down to the nanometer scale. Readers of this book will become familiar with the concepts and techniques of nanotribology, explained by an international team of scientists and engineers, actively involved and with long experience in this field.
The volumes V, VI and VII examine the physical and technical foundation for recent progress in applied scanning probe techniques. The first volume came out in January 2004 and the second to fourth volumes in early 2006. The field is progressing so fast that there is a need for a set of volumes every 12 to 18 months to capture latest developments.
Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can be exploited not only for nanomaterials characterization but also integrated with new technologies for in-situ nanomaterials engineering and manipulation. Scanning Microscopy for Nanotechnology addresses the rapid development of these techniques for nanotechnology, in both technique and application chapters by leading practitioners. The book covers topics including nanomaterials imaging, X-ray microanalysis, high-resolution SEM, low kV SEM, cryo-SEM, as well as new techniques such as electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM).
The volumes V, VI and VII examine the physical and technical foundation for recent progress in applied scanning probe techniques. The first volume came out in January 2004 and the second to fourth volumes in early 2006. The field is progressing so fast that there is a need for a set of volumes every 12 to 18 months to capture latest developments.
The so-called HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) acronym is well known in the food industry in relation to the management of microbiological, chemical and physical risks. With relation to HACCP risks, packaging materials should be studied and recognised as one of key factors affecting food safety.
With the emergence of new therapies for diseases which affect vital organs either partially or as a whole, the complexity of the parameter interaction and the variety of new discoveries opens many possibilities to implement these proposals into clinical use.