Nobelium (No) - Discovery, Occurrence, Production, Properties and Applications of Nobelium

Chemical Formula

No

Background

In 1957, a group of scientists at the Nobel Institute of Physics in Sweden discovered a new element with a half-life of 10 min by bombarding curuim-244 atoms with carbon-13 ions in a cyclotron. In 1958, another team consisting of John R. Walton, Torbørn Sikkeland, Glenn T. Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso working at the University of California, Berkeley attempted to confirm the discovery of the former team, and failed to produce that isotope. However, the Berkeley team did produce nobelium-254 with a half-life of 3 s by bombarding curium-246 atoms with carbon-12 ions. A third group from the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Russia was also unable to produce the Noble institute team's results, but they confirmed Berkeley's group work. Hence the credit for the discovery of nobelium was given to the scientists of the University of California.

Basic Information

Name Nobelium
Symbol No
Atomic number 102
Atomic weight 259 amu
Standard state Presumably a solid at 298 K
CAS Registry ID 10028-14-5
Group name Actinoid
Period in periodic table 7
Block in periodic table f-block
Color Unknown, but probably metallic and silvery white or grey in appearance
Classification Metallic
Melting point 1100 K (827°C or 1520°F)
Boiling point Unknown

Occurrence

Nobelium is not found in nature.

Isotopes

Nobelium has 12 radioactive isotopes with mass numbers from 250No to 262No. The longest-lived isotopes of nobelium include

  • 259No with a half-life of 51.5 min
  • 255No, with a half-life of 31.8 min
  • 253No with a half-life of 1.7 min.

Production

Nobelium is produced via nuclear bombardment of californium-249 or other transuranium atoms with carbon-12 ions in the cyclotron.

Key Properties

The key properties of nobelium are listed below:

  • It is a radioactive rare earth metal
  • It is usually divalent in aqueous solution and hence more stable.

Applications

Nobelium applications are limited to scientific research only.

References

G.P. Thomas

Written by

G.P. Thomas

Gary graduated from the University of Manchester with a first-class honours degree in Geochemistry and a Masters in Earth Sciences. After working in the Australian mining industry, Gary decided to hang up his geology boots and turn his hand to writing. When he isn't developing topical and informative content, Gary can usually be found playing his beloved guitar, or watching Aston Villa FC snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.

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