Materials and Austceram 2009 Videos

Materials and Austceram 2009 Videos
Phil Harrip from Scientific Solutions demonstrates the SITA Dynamic Surface Tensiometer used for measuring surface tension. He shows us how the instrument works, key components and describes commercial applications that the SITA Dynamic Surface Tensiometer is suited to such as detergent and surfactant manufacturers, coating manufacturers and inkjet manufacturers.
Dr. Lou Vance, Chief Scientist at ANSTO tells us about a technology called Synroc that they have been developing over many years to neutralise nuclear waste. He tells us about the origins of Synroc, the structure of Synroc, how Synroc is made and its commercial success to date.
Learn about the services that Hitech Materials, a recently established Australian company, can provide to companies who use advanced ceramic materials, in particular refractories and other materials that are subject to operating in severe environments. Although recently established Hitech Materials have a wealth of knowledge and contacts to offer impartial advice and testing services if required.
Phil Harrip from Scientific Solutions shows us through the Misco AMAX 30 Refractometer. He points out key features and demonstrates the ease of use of the instrument, as well as showing us how repeatable results determined by the refractometer are.
Theory tells us that when materials are heated they expand. Well this is not always the case. Mehdi Soodi from Swinburne University tells us about some unusual materials that actually shrink as they are heated. These are otherwise known as "negative thermal expansion materials".
George Collins CEO of the CAST Cooperative Research Centre in Australia explains what who his organisation is and what they have set out to do and who is involved. In particular CAST partner with members of industry and look to improve processes and materials.
Anne Barnett from Izon demonstrates their brand new qNano nanoparticle characterization system. She describes how it works, principles of operation and points out the key components. She then goes on to provide a demonstration of how easy the qNano is to use and explains how the results can be interpretted and used to determine particle size distributions and even particle shape.
Dr. Dan Perera from UNSW gives us an introduction to geopolymers. He explains what they are, their origins, their similarity to organic polymers, their structure, how products are made from geopolymers and their applications including the possibility of using them for storage of nuclear waste materials.
Phil Harrop from Scientific Solutions walks us through the Gamry Potentiostat which is an extremely sensitive device that can be used for corrosion studies. It would be of use to anyone who needs to perform accelerated corrosion testing, such as coating manufacturers or metal manufacturers.