Pittcon 2011 Interviews Videos

Pittcon 2011 Interviews Videos
Mark Bumiller from Horiba shows us their latest addition, the SZ-100, nanoparticle size analyzer/characterization system. It is suited to analyzing particles in the sub-micron range. The SZ-100 uses dynamic light scattering (DLS) technology to look at brownian motion to measure particle size.
Brian Litteer from PANalytical shows us the Anton Paar HPC900 high pressure chamber sample stage for their range of x-ray diffractometers (XRD), such as the X'Pert Powder and The Empyrean. The HPC900 can operate at pressures up to 100 atmospheres and temperatures as high as 900°C and is a valuable tool in being able to examine materials under various temperature and/or pressure conditions, rather then processing samples and post examining them.
James Brenner from Extrel shows us the MAX300-LG, which is a mass spectrometer for TGA (thermogravimetric analyzers). It can be retrofitted to any TGA on the market.
Ed Gooding from Princeton Instruments shows us their Acton 2300 spectrometer that can be fitted with a vast array of detectors. In this demonstration the Acton Sp2300 is connected to the ProEM EMCCD camera and the SPEC-10 CCD, but can be interfaced with most Raman, fluorescence, photoluminescence and optical spectroscopy detectors.
Bob Fiddler from Netzsch shows us their STA 449 F1 simultaneous thermal analyzer that can measure TGA (thermogravimetry), DCS (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) and DTA (Differential Thermal Analysis). The new feature of the STA 449 F1 is that it can now be supplied with a off gas analysis systems such as the Bruker Tensor FT-IR.
Jeremy Warren Nanosight Zetasight instrument which offers an alternative method for determination of zeta potential to DLS. It differs from DLS in that it is able to measure zeta potential on a particle by particle basis so that it can determine the effect of particle size on zeta potential. As the Zetasight is a bolt on addition to the NS500, it is also able to measure the particle size of nanoparticles and produce particle size distribution data.
Jim Miller from Thermcraft introduces us to the Protege split tube furnace, the latest addition to the eXPRESS line of furnaces. The all in one unit includes controller, power supply and heating elements. The semi-exposed elements enable rapid heating rates, up to the maximum working temperature of 1100°C.
Jorge Riveras from Spectro Inc shows us their Spectroil Q100 system for oil condition monitoring. It is used for testing of oil to determine the amount of wear that is taking place with valuable machinery and measures contaminants and additives. It uses the atomic emission spectroscopy operating principle.
Chris Farine from Ceramaret shows us a range of their advanced ceramic materials such as ruby, sapphire, zirconia (ZrO2) and alumina (Al2O3) designed for use in harsh conditions such as solvents, acids and physiological environments.
Adam Gilmore from Horiba shows us their all new, first to market Aqualog, simultaneous absorbance and fluorescence EEMS (excitation emission matrices) system. It uses a CCD as the detector making it 100 time faster than other instruments. This means that measurements that may have taken several minutes can now be completed in just seconds.
Del Redfern from Oxford Instruments shows us their X-MAX silicon drift detector, the world's largest area silicon drift detector (SDD). The X-MAX is suited to almost all SEMs and most TEMs and produces the best performance for a SDD with resolution down to 124eV for Manganese and less than 50eV for Carbon. The X-MAX also features high speed analysis, leading to high throughput and excellent data integrity.
Brian Litteer from PANalytical shows us their X'Pert Powder x-ray diffractometer (XRD). It features PANalytical's easy change module feature, which enables the user to quickly change optical modules, sample stages and detectors. Accurate machining means that once installed, the modules are almost perfectly aligned. The X'Pert powder is a general use XRD system and is ideal for quality control applications where higher end instruments are unneccessary.
Jorge Riveras from Spectro Inc shows us their SpectroVISC system and explains how it works and it's capabilities. The system is designed to measure kinematic viscosity of oil and fuel samples such as mineral oils or silicone oils. It is fast and easy to use and can process 50-60 samples per hour according to ASTM D445 and also features an auto cleaning system to prepare for the next sample.
Rob Morris from Ocean Optics shows us their STS Microspectrometers which are the smallest spectrometers ever! The use CMOS detection technology and have spectrographic performance comparable to much larger instruments.
Tom Powers from Aspex Corp takes a few minutes to tell us about their new OmegaMax EDX system with SDD (silicon drift detector) technology. It can be assembled in arrays with windows from 5 to 30mm2. It can perform elemental analysis in SEMs like the PSEM eXpress and can detect elements from boron to uranium, with excellent accuracy for light elements.
Jim Miller from Thermcraft shows us their transparent tube furnace that was originally developed by MIT. The transparent nature of the furnace allows the user to gain valuable insights into what is happening to their sample at various temperatures so they can develop a good understanding of what is happening during their process. The transparent tube furnace is primarily used in research applications where chemical and physical changes as a function of temperature can be observed.
Jon Shein from Thermo Scientific Niton Analyzers introduces us to a new concept in XRF analyzers. The Niton FXL combines the ease of use of a handheld XRF analyzer with the performance of a lab grade instrument. The Niton FXL is a fully portable instrument that can operate using batteries or AC power.
Alexander Seyfarth introduces us to the Bruker Tracer IV-GEO handheld XRF (x-ray fluorescence) analyzer developed specifically for geosciences and geological sample identification and can analyze elements from magnesium to uranium.. The Tracer IV-GEO is the latest latest addition to the Tracer family of XRF instruments and features a 30mm2 silicon drift detector.
Jorge Riveras from Spectro Inc shows us their SpectroFTIR Alpha Q410 oil analyzer. This compact instrument has been specifically designed for looking at oil and fuel samples.
Mark Buckley from Hiden Analytical shows the sensitivity and responsiveness of the Hiden QGA Quantitative Gas Analyzer using some simple real time demonstrations. He also shows us some of the instruments' capabilities and analytical abilities.
Mike Dickson from Phenom World shows us their all new G2 Pro Desktop Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). This is it's first public showing since it's launch just a few weeks ago. The G2 pro is the fastest and simplest to use SEM designed for use by the non-professional.
Kevin Dahl from Malvern Instruments introduces us to their new Morphologi G3-ID. Built in the same platform as the Morphologi G3S, it is able to measure particle size and shape using optical microscopy and image analysis. The new addition is the Raman spectrometer which allows chemical identification of each particle to be made and can be compared to standards stored in the library of the software.
Curt Marcott from Light Light Solutions tells us about his experiences characterizing materials using the NanoIR from Anasys Instruments. In particular he was excited by the fact that the technique combines AFM and IR spectroscopy, and has spatial resolution an order of magnitude better than conventional IR, which means you can characterize various features of a sample, or even analyze compositional differences across an interface.
Jorge Riveras tells about the SpectroLNF Q200, laserNet fines system manufactured by Lockheed Martin and distributed exclusively by Spectro Inc. The SpectroLNF Q200 characterizes wear particles in lubricants such as engine oils, hydraulic fluids and diesel oils. The system images particles and then classifies them by size and shape so that the type of wear taking place cen be identified so that preventative maintenance can be prescribed.
The Terra is the world's first portable XRD (X-ray diffractometer). It weighs about 15kg and has enough battery power to run for approximately 7-8 hours and features a resolution that is comparable to larger laboratory sized XRD units.
The MiniRam III from B&W Tek is a compact, portable Raman spectrometer with in-built power supply, computing power and touch screen interface. Robert Chimenti points out the main features and runs a demonstration, which shows how fast the instrument is to use.
Ernie Hillier from Waters shows us their Acquity Patrol Laboratory Analyzer. It is a walk-up system that uses UPLC, liquid chromatography technology and is suited to such things as process development and reaction monitoring. It has also been designed to integrate with its sister instrument that has been designed for use on the factor floor and monitoring industrial/manufacturing operations.
Dan Davis from Shimadzu shows us their EDX-LE benchtop x-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument. he shows us key features such as the sample positioning camera and runs a sample in real time for us.
Martin Thomas from Quantachrome tells us about their new Porometer 3G capillary liquid expulsion porometer that is on show for the first time at Pittcon. The Porometer 3G can measure the pore size and quantity of sheet-like materials like filters and battery separators. This is done by measuring gas flow through the sample, as the applied pressure is changed.
Duane Sword from Thermo Fisher Scientific shows us the TruScan RM handheld Raman Spectrometer which was recently introduces and is the world's smallest Raman spectrometer . It enables non-contact, non-invasive identification of materials. He demonstrates just how easy it is to use and how quickly it produces results.
Stefan Wegner from Kruess Optronic shows us their range of refractometers paying particular attention to their DR6000 benchtop digital refractometer. The DR6000 features an easy to use touchscreen interface with multiple language facility and PC communications. It can also connect back to the factory for repairs if possible.
Dave Depasquale from Waters introduces us to their UPSFC system that utilizes supercritical fluid chromatography technology which builds on their well established UPLC technology. In doing so he shows us the various components to the system and their functions and outlines the advantages of the SFC technology over more conventional liquid chromatography technology.
Robert Chimenti shows us the i-Raman from B&W Tek. It is an award winning compact, portable Raman spectrometer with 3 wave number resolution. It can be optioned up with a video Raman microscope as per this set up.