Discovery of New Star-Shaped Molecule Could Help Develop Artificial Molecular Chainmail

Atoms in the Star of David molecule. Image credit: University of Manchester

A new star-shaped molecule has been produced at The University of Manchester. It is considered to be the most complex molecule of its type to be ever created.

The molecule is made up of interlocking rings with two molecular triangles intertwined around each other thrice in order to form a hexagram. The interlocked molecules of the structure are very small and the length of each triangle around its perimeter is just 14 atoms long.

Alex Stephens, a PhD student at The University of Manchester created the ‘Star of David’ molecule, after scientists have been trying to produce this molecule for over a quarter of a century. David Leigh, a professor at the School of Chemistry at The University of Manchester, stated that the discovery of this molecule marked a very special day in the field of biological sciences.

Star Of David flyaround

Molecular chainmail is used in nature to create the tough shells of specific viruses and now it is possible to imitate its amazing properties. This research is a key step towards creating man-made molecular chainmail, which could develop flexible, tough and light materials using nanotechnology.

The research team now plans to advance their research by creating more complicated interlocked structures which are larger in size. The study titled 'A Star of David catenane' has been published in the Nature Chemistry journal.

Alexander Chilton

Written by

Alexander Chilton

Alexander has a BSc in Physics from the University of Sheffield. After graduating, he spent two years working in Sheffield for a large UK-based law firm, before relocating back to the North West and joining the editorial team at AZoNetwork. Alexander is particularly interested in the history and philosophy of science, as well as science communication. Outside of work, Alexander can often be found at gigs, record shopping or watching Crewe Alexandra trying to avoid relegation to League Two.

Citations

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

  • APA

    Chilton, Alexander. (2014, September 23). Discovery of New Star-Shaped Molecule Could Help Develop Artificial Molecular Chainmail. AZoM. Retrieved on November 27, 2021 from https://www.azom.com/news.aspx?newsID=42445.

  • MLA

    Chilton, Alexander. "Discovery of New Star-Shaped Molecule Could Help Develop Artificial Molecular Chainmail". AZoM. 27 November 2021. <https://www.azom.com/news.aspx?newsID=42445>.

  • Chicago

    Chilton, Alexander. "Discovery of New Star-Shaped Molecule Could Help Develop Artificial Molecular Chainmail". AZoM. https://www.azom.com/news.aspx?newsID=42445. (accessed November 27, 2021).

  • Harvard

    Chilton, Alexander. 2014. Discovery of New Star-Shaped Molecule Could Help Develop Artificial Molecular Chainmail. AZoM, viewed 27 November 2021, https://www.azom.com/news.aspx?newsID=42445.

Tell Us What You Think

Do you have a review, update or anything you would like to add to this news story?

Leave your feedback
Submit